Based in Northern California, found Footage Fiction is a blog by author Josh Hancock. Posts include reviews of books, films, haunted attractions, and other events within the horror community. Josh is the author of The Girls of October (2015) and The Devil and My Daughter (2016), both published by Burning Bulb Press. He ALSO WRITES FOR HORROR NOVEL REVIEWS, ADDICTED TO HORROR MOVIES, SCREAM QUARTERLY MAGAZINE, and MORBIDLY BEAUTIFUL.

Review: HOUSE OF WAXWORK ISSUE 1

Review: HOUSE OF WAXWORK ISSUE 1

As a kid, I had several of those read-along record books, my favorites including the Haunted Mansion, Treasure Island, and Davy Crockett. So it was with great enthusiasm that I quickly snatched up House of Waxwork's Issue 1 of their new comic book/record anthology series. As a long-time fan of Waxwork Records, this purchase was a no-brainer, and I was immediately impressed with the very reasonable price and options for color variants of the vinyl. I opted for "Occult Slumber Party Green Splatter" and couldn't wait to get my hands on this 7" gem and its accompanying comic book. Just opening the package was a thing of beauty (the cover art was created by the amazing Justin Erickson, and each comic story features a movie poster designed by Marc Schoenbach), but listening to the record while reading the two stories within the comic was an awesome experience, a trip back into childhood but with a delightfully morbid edge.

The first story in the issue, "Occult Slumber Party," tells the playful and haunting tale of a family board game that turns terrifying and deadly. The artwork--by Christian DiBari, Mike Spicer, and Rachel Deering--pops with bold lettering and vibrant colors, while the story, penned by Gabe Soria, is suspenseful and darkly humorous. In Kevin Bergeron's "Lighthouse Keeper," a grizzled ex-convict is forced to confront an otherworldly evil when he agrees to take on a new job as the watchman of an old lighthouse. Conveyed in dark, watery greens and blues, the artwork (Jonas Scharf, Jordan Boyd, Deering) is once again perfect, the pages crisp and sharp, every panel filled with ominous detail. Like George Romero and Stephen King's anthology Creepshow, House of Waxwork's first issue is 32 pages of supernatural horror that readers will want to treasure and read again and again.

Composed by Douglas Pipes (Krampus, Trick 'r Treat) and Creeper, the music that accompanies each story is horror vinyl at its finest. Thrilling, moody, eerie, and robust--all these notes and more are hit on both sides of the recording. My best recommendation is to begin reading "Occult Slumber Party" and "Lighthouse Keeper" at the moment that the music starts; you'll find, however inadvertently, that just as you are reaching a climactic point of the story, the music will correspond in tune. It's an experience that every horror and comic fan, young or old, should experience and it allows for an immersive and spine-tingling good time.

Like many fans throughout the world, I can't wait to see what Waxwork Records and House of Waxwork have in store next. For now, you can visit their website here in order to pick up your very own copy and original soundtrack music on colored vinyl.

Review: Grady Hendrix's MY BEST FRIEND'S EXORCISM

Review: Grady Hendrix's MY BEST FRIEND'S EXORCISM

Review: Danielle Vega's THE MERCILESS

Review: Danielle Vega's THE MERCILESS